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Westwood, NJ 07675

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Home » Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Ocular Hypertension

Ocular Hypertension

Ocular hypertension means the pressure in your eye, or your intraocular pressure (IOP), is higher than normal levels. Elevated IOP is also associated with glaucoma, which is a more serious condition that causes vision loss and optic nerve damage. By itself, however, ocular hypertension doesn't damage your vision or eyes.

Studies suggest that 2% to 3% of the general population may have ocular hypertension.

Signs and symptoms of ocular hypertension

You can't tell by yourself that you have ocular hypertension, because there are no outward signs or symptoms such as pain or redness. At each eye exam, your eyecare practitioner will measure your IOP and compare it to normal levels.

During routine eye exams, a tonometer is used to measure your IOP. Your eye typically is numbed with eye drops, and a small probe gently rests against your eye's surface. Other tonometers direct a puff of air onto your eye's surface to indirectly measure IOP.

What causes ocular hypertension?

Anyone can develop ocular hypertension, but it's most common in African-Americans, people over 40, those with family history of ocular hypertension or glaucoma, and those with diabetes or high amounts of nearsightedness.

IOP may become elevated due to excessive aqueous fluid production or inadequate drainage. Certain medications, such as steroids, and trauma can cause higher-than-normal IOP measurements as well.

Ocular hypertension treatment

People with ocular hypertension are at increased risk for developing glaucoma, so some eye doctors prescribe medicated eye drops to lower IOP in cases of ocular hypertension. Because these medications can be expensive and may have side effects, other eye doctors choose to monitor your IOP and only take action if you show signs of developing glaucoma. Because of the increased risk for glaucoma, you should have your IOP measured at the intervals your doctor recommends if you have ocular hypertension.

 

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Valley Eye Associates is OPEN for all patients and appointment types.

 

Below are the safety protocols that have been put in place for all visiting patients:

  1. All equipment is cleaned with 70% isopropyl alcohol before and after each use.
  2. A protective plastic shield has been installed at the front check in area.
  3. Upon arrival each patient will need their temperature checked with a non-contact thermometer.
  4. We will use our online check-in form as well as requiring any insurance cards or documents to be sent to us via text/email if possible.
  5. All payments can be made with credit card by phone.
  6. All visitors will be required to wear a face covering or mask at all times. You will NOT be allowed to enter without wearing one.
  7. All pick-ups, adjustments, and other visits will require an appointment time. This is needed so that we know when to expect you and can distance you from anyone else.
  8. Please come at your scheduled time. If you arrive too early you may have to wait in your car. If you arrive too late for us to perform the necessary tests for your exam you may have to be rescheduled.
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Feel free to call us at 201-664-0847 during our business hours or visit our website at www.2020nj.com to reschedule your appointment.

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